What Happens When Bail is Revoked?

Whenever a person is released on bail, there are release conditions; these conditions usually include who they can contact related to the case, when they need to appear in court, and any other conditions set by the judge. If the defendant violates these conditions, bail can be revoked, meaning that the person can be taken back into custody. Money or property used for bail is then forfeited to the government.

Ways That Bail Can Be Revoked

  • If you don’t appear in court, also known as “jumping bail,” you can have your bail revoked.
  • If you are arrested on another charge for another crime, you can have your bail revoked.
  • If you fail to stay away from the alleged victim of the crime, that is often another case of bail being revoked.
  • If any of the above happens, you will likely be arrested again, either for the violation or for Failure to Appear in court.

Possible Outcomes For Bail Being Revoked

  • You may have a warrant for your arrest if your bail has been revoked.
  • The Failure to Appear (FTA) charge will be added to your first charge and also tried in court.
  • If you are difficult to reach, a bounty hunter may be assigned to find you and bring you back.
  • You will lose the property or money involved in your bail bond, a major loss.

Work With a Professional Bondsman

The good news is that, in some cases, bail can be reinstated through a process called remission. If you and your bail bondsman can establish that you didn’t understand an aspect of your conditions of release, or had an unintentional reason for missing court, or that you were very easy to find and wasted no government resources in your location, you have a chance of reinstating bond after having your bail revoked. Working with a qualified, licensed, and reputable bail bondsman, like those in the Bail Agent Network, is your best bet from the beginning. If you find yourself in a situation where your bail is revoked, they will work with you to establish a case for bail reinstatement.